School ‘Reform’: A Failing Grade by Diane Ravitch | The New York Review of Books


Diane Ravitch reviews Class Warfare: Inside the Fight to Fix America’s Schools and As Bad as They Say: Three Decades of Teaching in the Bronx.

This debate on reform discourse in the US [particularly the implications of the NCLB act] needs to be closely watched/heard by educators elsewhere who are enamoured of the possibilities of test-based accountability.

Because of its utopian goals, coupled with harsh sanctions, NCLB has turned out to be the worst federal education legislation ever passed. Recently, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan predicted that more than 80 percent of the nation’s public schools would be labeled “failing” this year by federal standards, including some excellent schools in which students (usually those with disabilities) were not on track to meet the target. By 2014, if the law is unchanged, very few public schools will not be labeled “failures.” No nation has ever achieved 100 percent proficiency for all its students, and no state in this nation is anywhere close to achieving it. No nation has ever passed a law that would result in stigmatizing almost every one of its schools. The Bush-era law is a public policy disaster of epic proportions, yet Congress has been unable to reach consensus about changing it.

via School ‘Reform’: A Failing Grade by Diane Ravitch | The New York Review of Books.

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About Irfan

I am an independent researcher and blogger interested in everything under the sun, but more so in the philosophy and history of education and education reform generally, and specifically in the so-called post colonial contexts

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