Archive | accountability in education RSS feed for this section

Unwarranted Intrusion : Education Next


As with many policy innovations, performance-based accountability in education is mutating into a caricature of itself. Never has this been clearer than in the reauthorization of Title I. The idea of giving schools and school districts greater flexibility in return for greater accountability for student performance–the original principle behind the “horse trade” of the 1980s–makes […]

Continue reading

When an adult took standardized tests forced on kids – The Answer Sheet – The Washington Post


This will be of interest to standardised tests enthusiasts. A longtime friend on the school board of one of the largest school systems in America did something that few public servants are willing to do. He took versions of his state’s high-stakes standardized math and reading tests for 10th graders, and said he’d make his scores […]

Continue reading

Affordable, but at what cost?


Published today in Pakistan Today‘s Sunday Magazine.  The complete magazine may be downloaded at review+54+for+web [huge file tho 26 MB] or read online here  When an over- loaded bus carrying 102 school-children from a Faisalabad institution plunged down a deep ravine on the curving motorway near the Kallar Kahar hills, the entire nation was stunned by the tragedy. 38 […]

Continue reading

School ‘Reform’: A Failing Grade by Diane Ravitch | The New York Review of Books


Diane Ravitch reviews Class Warfare: Inside the Fight to Fix America’s Schools and As Bad as They Say: Three Decades of Teaching in the Bronx. This debate on reform discourse in the US [particularly the implications of the NCLB act] needs to be closely watched/heard by educators elsewhere who are enamoured of the possibilities of […]

Continue reading

Roadmap to Winning an NCLB Waiver – Politics K-12 – Education Week


Politics of NCLB… Although Education Secretary Arne Duncan holds the ultimate power in choosing which states get a No Child Left Behind waiver and which don’t, a group of outside judges will wield a tremendous amount of influence in deciding states’ fates. And now, the very important peer review guidebook is out from the department, […]

Continue reading

Incentives and Test-based Accountability in Education?


Below are conclusions of an influential panel charged with studying the effects of incentives and test-based accountability in Education. A must read, especially for those who carry a strong stance in favour of test-based accountability as an important kernel of education reforms in Pakistan. Read the conclusions/recommendations: CONCLUSIONS Conclusion 1: Test-based incentive programs, as designed […]

Continue reading

Outcomes based Accountability?


In some previous posts (See here, here, here, here  and here) Just-questions voiced concerns about standardised testing as a basis for making teachers accountable for students’ learning.  Recently my friend Ajay Sharma drew my attention to a piece written by Nancy Folbre [an economist at University of Massachusettes] in NYT. She draws upon the economic theory to suggest that the high stakes tests-based […]

Continue reading

Education as a cure all?


Somewhere, perhaps in the 1970s, the idea of rates of return became the overarching mythology of the policy discourse about education. Interestingly, this has not always been the case. In fact the first notable use of production functions in education was in 1960s when James Samuel Coleman wrote the famous Coleman Report [But my research […]

Continue reading

Education Vouchers…Hither and Thither?


The decision by a Colorado District court which recently blocked the voucher program in the district is one example of public domain in action. It needs a strong sense of public interest grounded in the constitution and a general consensus on what constitutes public good to provide a constructive check on the encroachment of public […]

Continue reading

Any Standardised Test is Inauthentic?


‘Any standardised test is inauthentic and that you do not need to test in order to assess’…Provocative, ain’t it? Before you read on, let me say that this post, like some [not all] of the other posts on this blog, is an attempt to provide the readers of this blog with a range of opinions […]

Continue reading