Archive | Political Economy of Education RSS feed for this section

Teacher Tenure, other Debates, and Travelling Reforms


There is no question that ‘Teacher Tenure’ is becoming a hot political issue in the United States, and one which is worth following to develop some insights about the workings of political economy of education in the US.  In the 1990s, various factions in the U.S. were engaged in heated arguments over curriculum and standards.  There were […]

Continue reading

Cheating in Atlanta Schools


Haven’t you heard the sound of warning shots fired by some advocates on this problem already?  Haven’t you heard the warnings about the possibility of schools gaming the system when faced with high stakes test-based accountability measures? The report I read today describes one example of this actually happening in the state of Georgia in […]

Continue reading

Happiness, Choice, and Low Cost Schools


About the private schools in the developing countries–especially the so-called Affordable Private Schools (APSs) or the Low Fees Private Schools (LFPS), as they are sometimes called–it is now repeatedly claimed that  consumers of educational services are ‘happy’ with this breed of schools.  They are happy with them because they seem to be high on their order […]

Continue reading

Chain of Equivalence


In response to my post on ‘interest aggregation,’ Ajay Sharma wrote the following: I guess interest aggregation could need some sort of (Laclau’s) chain of equivalence so that different yet non-competing interests can comingle and aggregate. Getting such chain of equivalence to form and endure is a perennial challenge I just thought another post was warranted […]

Continue reading

‘Aggregate demand’ and ‘interest aggregation’


After a fascinating comment by Faisal on my last post and my response to it, I thought another post was warranted to attempt to clear some conceptual fog that may have been created when I used terms such as desire and demand, which were further elucidated by Faisal in his comment.  I had used the […]

Continue reading

Reform Society First?


Professor James Gee, Mary Lou Fulton Presidential Professor of Literacy Studies at Arizona State University and formerly a professor at University of Wisconsin, Madison’s graduate school of education, has recently written a thought-provoking article in Huffington Post.  He has titled it School Reform is a Dead End, Unless… Says James: A discussion about “society reform” […]

Continue reading

Diane Ravitch on improving Higher Education in Pakistan


American historian of education, and now NYU professor, was called upon to make a comment on higher education in Pakistan in 2005.  The comment is just as relevant today as it was when made. Her complete article is given at http://dianeravitch.com/improvingstandards.html Below, I quote from her main observations/conclusions: The educational system of a nation is […]

Continue reading