Tag Archives: Amartya Sen

Education as a Political Issue? (2)


This post continues the conversation started in a previous post on the topic of education as a political issue. In the last post, I had referred to Jean Drèze and Amartya Sen who lamented the absence of education from the political domain–or let us say the public domain. This post is about the rhetoric of […]

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Education as a Political Issue? (1)


The apathy of the Pakistani political elite [and public] toward education is increasingly coming under scrutiny.  A few posts on this blog have also commented on this issue. (See, for example, Enlightened Self Interest).  This post extends this conversation with reference to the work of Jean Dreze and Amartya Sen. Dreze and Sen, in their book  […]

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What are the London riots teaching us?


There are signs everywhere in the world that extreme inequalities are bad, bad, bad! what more evidence do we want to see than this ongoing mayhem in London? The situation is even more combustible in other regions of the world, such as in South Asia. There are well intentioned people who keep talking of reforms […]

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Liberty, Justice and Education: A Leaf from Amartya Sen’s ‘Development as Freedom’


The last post focused on the concepts of liberty.  Why did I even get there? All because of back and forth in response to an article written and posted on his Facebook page by my friend Faisal Bari.  The article was also posted on this blog and you can read it here if you haven’t […]

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Using Standardised Tests for Accountability?


Are standardised and large scale tests a credible means to measure progress toward ‘reforms?’ It sounds immediately attractive as one. Yet, raising the stakes for large scale standardised tests has not been without its cons. The field of psychometrics owes itself to the attempts to find a way out of the formidable problems presented by […]

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Happiness, Choice, and Low Cost Schools


About the private schools in the developing countries–especially the so-called Affordable Private Schools (APSs) or the Low Fees Private Schools (LFPS), as they are sometimes called–it is now repeatedly claimed that  consumers of educational services are ‘happy’ with this breed of schools.  They are happy with them because they seem to be high on their order […]

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